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The Messenger
6,75 € *
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In The Messenger: The Meanings of the Life of Muhammad, leading Muslim scholar Tariq Ramadan considers the ways in which the Prophet's actions, words and teachings can guide us in the modern world.The life of the Prophet Muhammad, to whom the Angel Gabriel revealed the verses of the Quran, has provided inspiration to Muslims for hundreds of years.Interspersed with spiritual and philosophical meditations, this profound and stimulating biography shows how Muhammad's message can be used to address some of today's most controversial issues - from the treatment of the poor and the role of women to the interpretation of jihad and relations with other religions. It offers Muslims a new understanding of Muhammad's life and introduces non-Muslims to the story of the Prophet and to the riches of Islam.'Fascinating ... punctuated by spiritual reflections, it tells Muhammad's life from orphaned childhood to his death, with Islam dominant across Arabia'The Times'Draws lesson that are crucial for Muslims and non-Muslims alike'Financial Times'Communicates a sense of spiritual transcendence'Guardian'Important, readable and intelligent ... an eloquent account of the religion's founder and his core teachings'Scotland on SundayTariq Ramadan is Professor of Contemporary Islamic Studies at the Faculty of Oriental Studies and St Antony's College (University of Oxford). He is the Director of the Centre for Islamic Legislation and Ethics (Doha) He is the author of The Quest for Meaning and The Messenger, and has been described as one of the 'most important innovators for the twenty-first century' by Time magazine.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 21.01.2020
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Kill the Messenger, Hörbuch, Digital, 1, 274min
9,95 € *
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At the end of a long day battling street traffic, bike messenger Jace Damon has one last drop to make. But en route to delivering a package for one of L.A.'s sleaziest defense attorneys, he's nearly run down by a car, chased through back alleys, and shot at. Only the instincts acquired while growing up on the streets of L.A. allow him to escape with his life, and with the package someone wants badly enough to kill for. Jace returns to Lenny Lowell's office only to find the cops there, the lawyer dead, and Jace himself considered the prime suspect in the savage murder. Suddenly he's on the run from both the cops and a killer, and the key to saving himself and his 10-year-old brother is the envelope he still has, which holds a message no one wants delivered: the truth. In a city fueled by money, celebrity, and sensationalism, the murder of a bottom-feeding mouthpiece like Lenny Lowell won't make the headlines. So when detectives from the LAPD's elite robbery/homicide division show up, homicide detective Kev Parker wants to know why. Robbery/Homicide has no reason to be looking at a dead small-time scumbag lawyer or chasing a bike messenger...unless there's something in it for them. Maybe Lenny Lowell had a connection to something big enough to be killed for. Parker begins a search for answers that will lead him to a killer, or the end of his career. Because if there's one lesson he's learned over the years, it's that in a town built on fantasy and fame, delivering the truth can be deadly. 1. Language: English. Narrator: Erik Davies. Audio sample: http://samples.audible.de/bk/rand/000455/bk_rand_000455_sample.mp3. Digital audiobook in aax.

Anbieter: Audible
Stand: 21.01.2020
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Kill the Messenger , Hörbuch, Digital, 1, 763min
9,95 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

At the end of a long day battling street traffic, bike messenger Jace Damon has one last drop to make. But en route to delivering a package for one of L.A.'s sleaziest defense attorneys, he's nearly run down by a car, chased through back alleys, and shot at. Only the instincts acquired while growing up on the streets of L.A. allow him to escape with his life, and with the package someone wants badly enough to kill for. Jace returns to Lenny Lowell's office only to find the cops there, the lawyer dead, and Jace himself considered the prime suspect in the savage murder. Suddenly he's on the run from both the cops and a killer, and the key to saving himself and his 10-year-old brother is the envelope he still has, which holds a message no one wants delivered: the truth. In a city fueled by money, celebrity, and sensationalism, the murder of a bottom-feeding mouthpiece like Lenny Lowell won't make the headlines. So when detectives from the LAPD's elite robbery/homicide division show up, homicide detective Kev Parker wants to know why. Robbery/Homicide has no reason to be looking at a dead small-time scumbag lawyer or chasing a bike messenger...unless there's something in it for them. Maybe Lenny Lowell had a connection to something big enough to be killed for. Parker begins a search for answers that will lead him to a killer, or the end of his career. Because if there's one lesson he's learned over the years, it's that in a town built on fantasy and fame, delivering the truth can be deadly. 1. Language: English. Narrator: Scott Brick. Audio sample: http://samples.audible.de/bk/rand/000454/bk_rand_000454_sample.mp3. Digital audiobook in aax.

Anbieter: Audible
Stand: 21.01.2020
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The Chimes , Hörbuch, Digital, 1, 191min
9,95 € *
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A poverty stricken old man, Toby "Trotty" Veck, who does odd messenger jobs for cash is in wonder at the cruelty and heartlessness of the world. He contemplates whether people are good or bad and through a series of events with a prostitute and her abusive pimp, corrupt politicians, purse thieves, and a mother who commits suicide after killing her child, he sees that people are indeed vile and evil beings who must be born that way to be so awful. On his way home, Trotty stumbles upon a man who some corrupt politicians are trying to capture. He is very poor and carrying a little girl. The two of them return to Trotty's house where they are cared for and fed by Trotty's family. That very night, goblins from the bell tower come down and whisk Trotty away, taking him into the future on a mission to show Trotty that people are not born bad. Trotty must endure scenes of the way his family, and the pair that he took in, end up - with the little girl working as a prostitute, and the man ending up in jail attempting suicide, and more. As Trotty sees how these circumstances developed, he finally realizes a great lesson that evil is created in man but not born within him. 1. Language: English. Narrator: Philippe Duquenoy. Audio sample: http://samples.audible.de/bk/acx0/068587/bk_acx0_068587_sample.mp3. Digital audiobook in aax.

Anbieter: Audible
Stand: 21.01.2020
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The Bojabi Tree , Hörbuch, Digital, 1, 18min
9,95 € *
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The Bojabi Tree is a version of a traditional West African story. Scarce rainfall has hit the African plains. Animals are becoming more and more desperate to find something to eat when they happen upon an amazing tree with enticing fruit. The problem is that they don’t know the name of the tree and if the fruit is safe to eat. The starving animals decide to send messengers to King Leo, the king of the beasts, to learn the name of the tree. But each messenger returns having forgotten the name of the tree. A tortoise named Tommy volunteers to visit King Leo but the starving animals do not believe he can accomplish the task where the other messengers have failed. Like many worthy children’s animal stories, there is a moral and a lesson to be learned. A few words about the author, Edith Rickert. While not well-known, Ms. Rickert was a brilliantly intelligent woman with immense literary and cryptographical talents. The reason she was not well-known was that she was a strong woman in an era where strong women were not allowed to exist without the aid of a male counterpart. After spending time in Europe, she returned to the United States and worked as a writer in Boston for a few years. She then moved to Washington DC to work as a cryptographer for the government during World War I. She would later become an influential medieval scholar at the University of Chicago. 1. Language: English. Narrator: Tom Weiss. Audio sample: http://samples.audible.de/bk/mike/002779/bk_mike_002779_sample.mp3. Digital audiobook in aax.

Anbieter: Audible
Stand: 21.01.2020
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Don't Blame the Shorts: Why Short Sellers Are A...
28,99 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Listed in Bloomberg's TOP 50 BUSINESS BOOKS OF 2010 and shortlisted for Spear's FINANCIAL HISTORY OF THE YEAR AWARD "Robert Sloan works in the hedge-fund industry. As he shows in this readable polemic, dislike of shorting has a long history. . . . Someone has to point out when the emperor has no clothes. The shorts were among the biggest skeptics of the subprime-mortgage boom and of the banks that financed it. And when they were proved right, their activities were banned. Gratitude, huh?" The Economist "If Robert Sloan manages to go the distance in Don't Blame the Shorts, it is because his book is as much about historical tensions between Washington and Wall Street as the practice of short selling. He puts it all in the context of the opposing views of the federalist Alexander Hamilton, who was pro-speculation, and Jeffersonian republicans, who were pro-agriculture and convinced that making money from money was nonsense. . . . His book is a useful corrective to the view of short selling as 'unpatriotic' or uniquely antisocial . . . it is a brave act to take on anti-finance populists at this time." Financial Times "In this knowing book about the business of short-selling stocks, financier Robert Sloan gives a modern day lesson on why we shouldn't shoot the messenger. . . Rather than blast short sellers, we should praise them for exposing management methane. . . .The story may be old, but Sloan's easy and informative writing makes for a thoroughly worthwhile update." Barron's "Bob Sloan, a Wall Street veteran, cites the confrontation in his new book, Don't Blame the Shorts, as evidence that blind fury from politicians and unrepentant shrugs from bankers are far from new. As the title suggests, Sloan's main thrust is to defend the practice of short-selling. . . . Today, Sloan says, the very same battle of ideas is being played out in America . . . this is just the latest bitter expression of the constant tension between a moneyed east coast financial elite, and the manufacturers, mom-and-pop shops and the scrappy entrepreneurs who bitterly resent the power of Wall Street-but don't want the cash taps to be turned off." The Observer "Timely, concise, accessible to the lay reader and with a decorously polemical edge, it is both revealing and entertaining. No matter what the politicians do, the markets will find a way to challenge the finaglers and the optimists who sustain them. Like the poor, the shorts will always be with us." Spear's "Post-crisis reading . . . best books on the financial crisis and its aftermath. . . . While other authors point accusing fingers, in his book, Don't Blame the Shorts, Robert Sloan leaps to the defense of short sellers who, as he describes, have been long scapegoated for market crashes and are once again in the wake of the recent crisis. The Dutch East India Company was blaming its troubles on them as far back as 1609." Economist.com "This book is a rare treat. Unlike most books about Wall Street, it is written from a perspective sympathetic to the banking and securities industries. Better still, Bob Sloan is not only a practitioner and market participant himself, but one with a fine sense of history. Sloan rightly describes prime brokerage as 'the largest, most unnoticed banking system in the word.'" Global Custodian "Short and to the point and very well researched. As we are living in an era of history repeating itself, Mr. Sloan depicts the negative market psychology that has transcended Wall Street since the birth of our nation." Instablog "Sloan's recent book...provides an excellent survey of the shorting debate. Sloan recounts how a succession of U.S. government agencies have enacted rules over the decades to restrain short sellers-usually in the aftermath of financial crises such as the one we have just endured. Sloan believes those rules have always had counterproductive results. Sloan's book is a smooth read, mainly because he has done his homework and has lots of entertaining scoundrels and inept politicians to write about... Sloan's work provides a real service to market regulators and practitioners alike. With a deft quill, he exposes the futility of government regulation while offering a useful back story to the views of contemporary market regulators." ABA Banking Journal About the Book: On the 80th anniversary of the Crash of 1929, we find ourselves peering backwards through a virtual looking-glass to a time when global markets were in free fall, and venerable financial institutions were in tatters. Yet, here in the present, these same patterns seem to repeat, causing cable newsers, Congressmen, and commoners alike to scream the same refrain, "Blame the short sellers!" Certainly, short sellers make convenient villains; for one thing, they win only when others lose. But in Don't Blame the Shorts, Bob Sloan taps into a 200-year-old American debate to convincingly and emphatically argue that short selling is not what ails our equities trading markets, but what keeps them honest. To Sloan, short sellers' objectives are simple: find overvalued securities and bet against overconfident investors. It's an approach that uncovered widespread fraud at Enron, WorldCom, HealthSouth, and other failed outfits long before regulators ever set foot in the door. Taking the long view of history, Sloan unearths the deep roots of the conflict over speculative investing and its role in our economy. It's a debate that oftentimes puts titans of American history and finance on opposite sides of the divide: Jefferson and Hamilton, over the fundamental nature of America's economic systems; a century later, J.P. Morgan and William Rockefeller, the brother of John D. Rockefeller, who was thought to be part of a cabal of short sellers that brought the country to its financial knees. Further, Sloan reintroduces us to the likes of Ferdinand Pecora, the federal prosecutor whose investigations in the early 1930s revealed a wide range of abusive practices of banks, and led to the creation of vital legislation, including the Glass-Steagall Act. Don't Blame the Shorts is an eye-opening account that overturns conventional wisdom about short selling, and the vital systemic (and symbolic) role it plays in making financial markets less opaque, more accountable, and, therefore, stronger.

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 21.01.2020
Zum Angebot
Don't Blame the Shorts: Why Short Sellers Are A...
28,99 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Listed in Bloomberg's TOP 50 BUSINESS BOOKS OF 2010 and shortlisted for Spear's FINANCIAL HISTORY OF THE YEAR AWARD "Robert Sloan works in the hedge-fund industry. As he shows in this readable polemic, dislike of shorting has a long history. . . . Someone has to point out when the emperor has no clothes. The shorts were among the biggest skeptics of the subprime-mortgage boom and of the banks that financed it. And when they were proved right, their activities were banned. Gratitude, huh?" The Economist "If Robert Sloan manages to go the distance in Don't Blame the Shorts, it is because his book is as much about historical tensions between Washington and Wall Street as the practice of short selling. He puts it all in the context of the opposing views of the federalist Alexander Hamilton, who was pro-speculation, and Jeffersonian republicans, who were pro-agriculture and convinced that making money from money was nonsense. . . . His book is a useful corrective to the view of short selling as 'unpatriotic' or uniquely antisocial . . . it is a brave act to take on anti-finance populists at this time." Financial Times "In this knowing book about the business of short-selling stocks, financier Robert Sloan gives a modern day lesson on why we shouldn't shoot the messenger. . . Rather than blast short sellers, we should praise them for exposing management methane. . . .The story may be old, but Sloan's easy and informative writing makes for a thoroughly worthwhile update." Barron's "Bob Sloan, a Wall Street veteran, cites the confrontation in his new book, Don't Blame the Shorts, as evidence that blind fury from politicians and unrepentant shrugs from bankers are far from new. As the title suggests, Sloan's main thrust is to defend the practice of short-selling. . . . Today, Sloan says, the very same battle of ideas is being played out in America . . . this is just the latest bitter expression of the constant tension between a moneyed east coast financial elite, and the manufacturers, mom-and-pop shops and the scrappy entrepreneurs who bitterly resent the power of Wall Street-but don't want the cash taps to be turned off." The Observer "Timely, concise, accessible to the lay reader and with a decorously polemical edge, it is both revealing and entertaining. No matter what the politicians do, the markets will find a way to challenge the finaglers and the optimists who sustain them. Like the poor, the shorts will always be with us." Spear's "Post-crisis reading . . . best books on the financial crisis and its aftermath. . . . While other authors point accusing fingers, in his book, Don't Blame the Shorts, Robert Sloan leaps to the defense of short sellers who, as he describes, have been long scapegoated for market crashes and are once again in the wake of the recent crisis. The Dutch East India Company was blaming its troubles on them as far back as 1609." Economist.com "This book is a rare treat. Unlike most books about Wall Street, it is written from a perspective sympathetic to the banking and securities industries. Better still, Bob Sloan is not only a practitioner and market participant himself, but one with a fine sense of history. Sloan rightly describes prime brokerage as 'the largest, most unnoticed banking system in the word.'" Global Custodian "Short and to the point and very well researched. As we are living in an era of history repeating itself, Mr. Sloan depicts the negative market psychology that has transcended Wall Street since the birth of our nation." Instablog "Sloan's recent book...provides an excellent survey of the shorting debate. Sloan recounts how a succession of U.S. government agencies have enacted rules over the decades to restrain short sellers-usually in the aftermath of financial crises such as the one we have just endured. Sloan believes those rules have always had counterproductive results. Sloan's book is a smooth read, mainly because he has done his homework and has lots of entertaining scoundrels and inept politicians to write about... Sloan's work provides a real service to market regulators and practitioners alike. With a deft quill, he exposes the futility of government regulation while offering a useful back story to the views of contemporary market regulators." ABA Banking Journal About the Book: On the 80th anniversary of the Crash of 1929, we find ourselves peering backwards through a virtual looking-glass to a time when global markets were in free fall, and venerable financial institutions were in tatters. Yet, here in the present, these same patterns seem to repeat, causing cable newsers, Congressmen, and commoners alike to scream the same refrain, "Blame the short sellers!" Certainly, short sellers make convenient villains; for one thing, they win only when others lose. But in Don't Blame the Shorts, Bob Sloan taps into a 200-year-old American debate to convincingly and emphatically argue that short selling is not what ails our equities trading markets, but what keeps them honest. To Sloan, short sellers' objectives are simple: find overvalued securities and bet against overconfident investors. It's an approach that uncovered widespread fraud at Enron, WorldCom, HealthSouth, and other failed outfits long before regulators ever set foot in the door. Taking the long view of history, Sloan unearths the deep roots of the conflict over speculative investing and its role in our economy. It's a debate that oftentimes puts titans of American history and finance on opposite sides of the divide: Jefferson and Hamilton, over the fundamental nature of America's economic systems; a century later, J.P. Morgan and William Rockefeller, the brother of John D. Rockefeller, who was thought to be part of a cabal of short sellers that brought the country to its financial knees. Further, Sloan reintroduces us to the likes of Ferdinand Pecora, the federal prosecutor whose investigations in the early 1930s revealed a wide range of abusive practices of banks, and led to the creation of vital legislation, including the Glass-Steagall Act. Don't Blame the Shorts is an eye-opening account that overturns conventional wisdom about short selling, and the vital systemic (and symbolic) role it plays in making financial markets less opaque, more accountable, and, therefore, stronger.

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 21.01.2020
Zum Angebot
Waiting for Gospel
53,90 CHF *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Synopsis: 'Christianity, as faith centered in Jesus as the Christ came to be called, got a foothold in the world, and for a vital and vocal minority changed the world, because it proclaimed a message that awakened men and women to possibilities for human life that they had either lost or never entertained. That message the first Christian evangelists (and Jesus himself, according to the record) called euangellion--good news, gospel. For its first two or three hundred years, Christianity was largely dependent for its existence upon the new zest for life that was awakened in persons who heard and were, as they felt, transformed, by that gospel; and at various and sundry points in subsequent history the Christian movement has found itself revitalized by the spirit of that same 'good news' in ways that spoke to the specifics of their times and places. 'The lesson of history is clear: the challenge to all serious Christians and Christian bodies today is not whether we can devise yet more novel and promotionally impressive means for the transmission of 'the Christian religion' (let alone this or that denomination); it is whether we are able to hear and to proclaim . . . gospel! We do not need statisticians and sociologists to inform us that religion--and specifically our religion, as the dominant expression of the spiritual impulse of homo sapiens in our geographic context--is in decline. We do not need the sages of the new atheism to announce in learned tomes (and on buses!) that 'God probably does not exist.' The 'sea of faith' has been ebbing for a very long time.' --from the Introduction Endorsements: 'Douglas John Hall is a treasure, a man I have known whose intellectual depth is matched only by his spirit of kindness. . . . So to is Waiting for Gospel. As people continue to discuss the place of the church in North America leaning on sociology and cultural studies, Doug Hall reminds us that in the end it will be only theology, a lived theology of existential depth, that will help. All the contemporary talk of church in North America has so often failed to provide truly unique and insightful thoughts . . . about how God's revelation in Jesus Christ is encountering people in this context, at this time. Waiting for Gospel propels us in that direction and therefore shines brightly, giving the reader value upon value.' --Andrew Root Olson Baalson Associate Professor of Youth and Family Ministry, Luther Seminary, St. Paul, Minnesota Author of The Promise of Despair: The Way of the Cross as the Way of the Church (2010) Author Biography: Douglas John Hall is Emeritus Professor of Christian Theology in the Faculty of Religious Studies of McGill University in Montreal. He is the author of more than twenty-five books, including Lighten Our Darkness (1976, 2001); Why Christian? (1998); God and Human Suffering (1986); The Steward (1990; Wipf & Stock, 2004); and The Messenger (Cascade Books, 2011). He has lectured widely in Canada, the United States, Germany, and Japan, and is the recipient of many honors, including the Distinguished Alumnus Award of Union Theological Seminary, the Joseph Sittler Award for Leadership in Theology, and the Order of Canada.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 21.01.2020
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The Last Kappa of Old Japan
18,90 CHF *
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With unique and playful illustrations this multicultural children's book is a classic Japanese fairy tale that young children and parents alike will love. The Last Kappa of Old Japan is a warmly written and beautifully illustrated children's book that introduces many aspects of traditional Japanese culture and folklore, while teaching an important lesson about environmentalism. The story is of a young Japanese farm boy who develops a friendship with a mythical creature— the kappa—a messenger of the god of water. The tale begins in post-Modern Japan when the boy is young and the kappa is healthy and ends when the kappa, now the last one left on Earth, keeps an important promise to his human friend. A story of love, friendship, and adventure, readers of all ages will enjoy this picture book by award-winning author/illustrator, Sunny Seki.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 21.01.2020
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